The worst thing you can do to a girl is saddle her with a sister early on in life. The sister is always going to be more beautiful or more intelligent or more virtuous or more cheerful or more obedient or wear better hats – none of which helps in the making of the confident, tough personality that one ought to be.

Because however rich or famous you become, one little bit of you always knows that your parents love your sister more than you do, which in my case, my mother pooh-poohs till date. And however old your sister becomes, she will always claim that she stuck to the safe and tested path because you were wild and rebellious enough for the entire family, which in my sister’s case, I refuse to acknowledge now that we are both in our 40s. Though we took different paths to reach here, I find that we haven’t wandered too far away from each other.

My sister and me, here we look happy enough in our hats.

But we spent all our growing up years fighting to the point of driving our mother to tears. It’s only when we both got married and left home, that we came to realize what we mean to each other.

Sisters and hats feature largely in ‘Holiday’ (1938) by George Cukor. Read the rest of the review on Upperstall.

 

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